Slice, Segment and Conquer Vs Organise, Multiply and Conquer

I suggest you, read the Book “The Tribe” written by Seth Godin, he explains there how you can build a tribe who can win you the market, a tribe which care about you, a tribe who want to crush your competitor, a tribe who makes you the part of their identity.

Further, I suggest you to read Marty Neumeier who elaborated that concept for business application. Here sharing you some part of his elaboration from his book Brand Flip.

Segmentation is a handy strategy for targeting customers in an existing market. You identify a large market, then cut it up into smaller slices according to categories such as geography (regions, countries, cities), demographics (age, gender, occupation, education, income), psycho-graphics (activities, interests, opinions), behavior (product usage, familiarity, loyalty), or benefit preference (one segment per preference).

Then you target each chunk with a different offering. Divide and conquer. But how do you segment a market that doesn’t exist yet? Or a quickly changing market where customers are moving targets? Or a market in which every customer wants to be his or her own segment? You have to flip your thinking. Instead of division, you need multiplication. Start with a small market and scale it up with social media. Multiply and conquer. Among the magical innovations wrought by the Internet is our ability to form groups across boundaries— whether geographic, demographic, psychographic, or other-graphic.

Social tools now allow ridiculously easy group-forming (REGF), a term coined by Sébastien Pacquet. REGF makes a hash out of segmentation, since people routinely ignore the boundaries marketers place on them. We just go where we want to go, do what we want to do, and become who we want to become. We want to be unique, but we want to be unique in groups. We want to stand out, but we want to stand out together. In the age of easy group-forming, the basic unit of measurement is not the segment but the tribe. A tribe is any group of people who share not only interests, but information.

You have to flip your thinking. Instead of division, you need multiplication. Start with a small market and scale it up with social media. Multiply and conquer. Among the magical innovations wrought by the Internet is our ability to form groups across boundaries— whether geographic, demographic, psychographic, or other-graphic. Social tools now allow ridiculously easy group-forming (REGF), a term coined by Sébastien Pacquet. REGF makes a hash out of segmentation, since people routinely ignore the boundaries marketers place on them.

We just go where we want to go, do what we want to do, and become who we want to become. We want to be unique, but we want to be unique in groups. We want to stand out, but we want to stand out together. In the age of easy group-forming, the basic unit of measurement is not the segment but the tribe. A tribe is any group of people who share not only interests, but information.

We just go where we want to go, do what we want to do, and become who we want to become. We want to be unique, but we want to be unique in groups. We want to stand out, but we want to stand out together. In the age of easy group-forming, the basic unit of measurement is not the segment but the tribe. A tribe is any group of people who share not only interests, but information.

They talk to each other. They identify with their tribes: I’m a surfer. I’m an Anglophile. I’m a gamer. I’m a cat person. They also identify with brands: I’m an Audi person. I’m an Android person. I’m a Mets fan. I’m a Thronie. Since tribes can form quickly and organically, they’re tailor -made for growing a brand.
A tribe is not just another type of segment. You don’t target a tribe. You support it. Grow it. Partner with it. Organize it. Research shows that customers who interact socially with other customers in a brand community often develop an intense sense of loyalty, both to the brand and to each other. ‘These are the people who are most likely to stand up and fight for your success.

The best question to ask any new-product marketer is not “What size is the market?”

but “You and what army?” Leaders often spend too much time organizing their employees, and not enough time organizing their customers-the group with the real power. By empowering and growing the tribe, you increase its strength against competing brands, which in turn increases your ability to support the tribe. What makes a brand strong is the mutual commitment between companies and their customers.

How do you build a tribe? The trick isn’t finding the biggest possible market.

It’s seeking out the truest possible fans. “Too many organizations care about numbers, not fans,” writes Seth Godin in his book Tribes. “What they’re missing is the depth of commitment and interconnection that true fans deliver.” What fans respect is generosity and bravery. A brave company is one that stands up for its customers.

In a time when everyone is a potential media outlet, it’s the true fans who can drive the conversation. But first they’ll ask, “What does sharing this information say about me?” Next they’ll ask, “Do I believe in the values of this company?” Every tribe has its social mores—its rules of behavior—a particular sense of what’s right and what’s wrong within the tribe. If you run afoul of these rules, you’ll be shunned.

For example, back in the 1960s, a manufacturer invented a new surfboard that was stronger, lighter, and virtually “ding proof.” This was exactly what surfers should have wanted. But the advertising made it obvious that the company was miles from any beach, and was blithely unaware of the heroes, history, and lingo of the sport. They were shut out by the tribe.

Tribes have insiders and outsiders. You can expand a tribe, but you can’t break its rules. Knowing the rules—or helping define them from the beginning—is a prerequisite for leading the tribe.

 

Anand

I am Passionate "Digital Marketing practitioner". I have the fair amount of experience in the traditional way of marketing & Brand building too.

Since 5 years I am self-learning this tech-based online marketing practice and ideas.

The purpose of this blog to share and receive the information and ideas to my community.

Prior to take formal education in Marketing Management. I studied History and India culture.

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